<html>
    <head>
      <base href="https://bugs.webkit.org/">
    </head>
    <body>
      <p>
        <div>
            <b><a class="bz_bug_link 
          bz_status_NEW "
   title="NEW - Ref<T> should support indirection operator *"
   href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=233384#c6">Comment # 6</a>
              on <a class="bz_bug_link 
          bz_status_NEW "
   title="NEW - Ref<T> should support indirection operator *"
   href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=233384">bug 233384</a>
              from <span class="vcard"><a class="email" href="mailto:rniwa@webkit.org" title="Ryosuke Niwa <rniwa@webkit.org>"> <span class="fn">Ryosuke Niwa</span></a>
</span></b>
        <pre>(In reply to Jean-Yves Avenard [:jya] from <a href="show_bug.cgi?id=233384#c4">comment #4</a>)
<span class="quote">> (In reply to Ryosuke Niwa from <a href="show_bug.cgi?id=233384#c3">comment #3</a>)
> > I'm pretty this is an intentional design choice because we wanted it to act
> > like a reference. 

> Indeed that was the intent, but the lack of operator.() in C++ makes it that
> you have to use -> to dereference it; as such, in practice it works like a
> pointer.</span >

Just because the presence of operator-> doesn't make it a pointer like. Ref::operator! works like T::operator! so it's not pointer-like in that regard for example. In fact, almost everything else doesn't behave like a pointer.</pre>
        </div>
      </p>


      <hr>
      <span>You are receiving this mail because:</span>

      <ul>
          <li>You are the assignee for the bug.</li>
      </ul>
    </body>
</html>