<html>
    <head>
      <base href="https://bugs.webkit.org/">
    </head>
    <body>
      <p>
        <div>
            <b><a class="bz_bug_link 
          bz_status_NEW "
   title="NEW - Prevent websites from talking to loopback interface (127.0.0.1, localhost)"
   href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=186039#c10">Comment # 10</a>
              on <a class="bz_bug_link 
          bz_status_NEW "
   title="NEW - Prevent websites from talking to loopback interface (127.0.0.1, localhost)"
   href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=186039">bug 186039</a>
              from <span class="vcard"><a class="email" href="mailto:ctclements@gmail.com" title="ctclements@gmail.com">ctclements</a>
</span></b>
        <pre>(In reply to Brent Fulgham from <a href="show_bug.cgi?id=186039#c9">comment #9</a>) 
<span class="quote">> I doubt IT departments are excited about you running invalidated server
> software on their corporate machines. Installing a certificate is a very low
> bar in comparison.</span >

So far, no issues there.  Is there a way that self-signing a certificate and installing it makes make my server software any more or less validated?

Irregardless of my specific use case, the point is that 3/4 relevant (in my industry) browsers are following the spec.  There is a reason we have web specifications.  Not following the specification ends up in odd cases like this where we either have to write more code to accomadate the one browser that doesn't follow the other 3, or simply tell customers we don't support the browser.</pre>
        </div>
      </p>


      <hr>
      <span>You are receiving this mail because:</span>

      <ul>
          <li>You are the assignee for the bug.</li>
      </ul>
    </body>
</html>