Oh, I understand. Thank you.<br><br>Do you think my advice is valuable or not? Maybe we can use webkit-gtk in many specific fields, there we can use other languages to program web front end, may be more powerful.<br><br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, May 22, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Eric Gregory <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:eric@yorba.org" target="_blank">eric@yorba.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im"><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, May 21, 2012 at 6:37 PM, Tang Daogang <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:daogangtang@gmail.com" target="_blank">daogangtang@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Why we only have and keep one language in browser? Google has released his Dart some days, which is to replace javascript in browser. If webkit-gtk can do GObject binding to DOM and other API, any/many language can do programming in browser, isn't it? I think this road is better than Dart.<br>

</blockquote></div><br></div>We're talking about two different things here.  Dart and Javascript are designed to be cross platform languages that can be run in any browser.  WebKit-Gtk and its GObject Introspection bindings are designed to be used in applications with built-in web browsers.<br>

<br>Certainly, you can't expect everyone on the web to be running WebKit-Gtk and various interpreters installed on their systems.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br><br>  - Eric<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Nothing is impossible.<br><br>