<div dir="ltr">On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 6:19 AM, Rodney Dowdall <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rdowdall@cranksoftware.com" target="_blank">rdowdall@cranksoftware.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>We currently have a port of WebKit that uses the WebKit API.  It works well, but the performance isn't quite at the level of some other WebKit ports.  </div><div><br></div><div>I was wondering if there would be an expected performance gain by using the Webkit2 API.  My line of thinking is that the streamlining that takes place under the WebKit API could be killing our performance. </div><div><br></div><div>Are there any performance numbers that show if there is a difference between the two API's? </div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Probably due to better memory locality, we see ~5% page load time performance improvement.</div><div><br></div><div>The fact each page gets loaded into a separate process also means memory tends to get less fragmented, and that results in lower memory usage over time in a typical web browsing scenario.</div><div><br></div><div>But it's hard to make a generic statement with regards to your port's slowness. If you're seeing your graphics performance to be bad, for example, that could be due to the way your graphics stack is hooked up with WebCore. Do you have JSC's JIT enabled in your port? If not, that would explain JS performance and general overall slowness in your port.</div><div><br></div><div>- R. Niwa</div></div></div></div>