<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 11:33 PM, Benjamin Poulain <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:benjamin@webkit.org" target="_blank">benjamin@webkit.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 11/6/13, 10:53 AM, John Mellor wrote:<br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">
On Sun, Oct 20, 2013 at 2:00 AM, Maciej Stachowiak &lt;<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com" target="_blank">mjs@apple.com</a><br></div><div class="im">
&lt;mailto:<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com" target="_blank">mjs@apple.com</a>&gt;&gt; wrote:<br>
 &gt;<br>
 &gt; My initial impression is that it seems a bit overengineered.<br>
<br>
I sympathize. The issue of srcN appearing to be a complex solution to a<br>
seemingly simple problem came up again on IRC chatting to rniwa, so I<br>
thought I&#39;d try to explain this briefly.<br>
<br>
Unfortunately, responsive images is a deceptively complex problem. There<br>
are 3 main use cases:<br>
1. dpr-switching: fixed-width image resolution based on devicePixelRatio.<br>
2. viewport-switching: flexible-width image resolution based on viewport<br>
width and devicePixelRatio.<br>
3. art direction: same as #1 or #2, except additionally, must serve<br>
completely different images based on viewport width.<br>
</div></blockquote>
<br>
How important and common are each of those use cases?<br>
Handling every imaginable use case by the Engine is a non-goal. </blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
There has been a lot of demand for dpr-switching since the first iPad Retina. This has caused some very ugly hacks on the Web. It is very important to address that issue.<br>
<br>
Viewport switching is usually done to adapt images for mobile device VS large/huge display devices. It is a valid concern but it is not easily addressed. Srcset can/should likely be improved regarding this.<br>
<br>
I believe (feel free to prove me wrong) dynamic viewport adaptation and what you call &quot;art direction&quot; is not as common.<br></blockquote><div> </div><div>On a survey ran at the last Mobilism conference (and on Twitter) 41% of respondents said they&#39;re already using some hack to get their responsive image &quot;art-directed&quot;.</div>
<div>A <a href="http://japborst.net/blog/the-current-state-of-art-direction.html">manual responsive site survey</a> showed that 23% of the sites &quot;art-direct&quot; their images, and 58% do that when (subjectively) the design requires it.</div>
<div>So it might not be as common as viewport switching (which is practically everywhere), but it is pretty common.</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

I have the feeling those corner cases may be better addressed with JavaScript.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I don&#39;t think art-direction qualifies as a corner case.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<br>
<br>
In my opinion WebKit should not support srcN in its current form. We are here to make the web a better/friendlier platform. The srcN proposal does not do that, it is a catch all that makes the important use cases more difficult.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>

<br>
Benjamin</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
webkit-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:webkit-dev@lists.webkit.org" target="_blank">webkit-dev@lists.webkit.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.webkit.org/mailman/listinfo/webkit-dev" target="_blank">https://lists.webkit.org/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/webkit-dev</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div>