<html><head>
<meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000"><br>
<br>
Oliver Hunt wrote:
<blockquote cite="mid:DD92178D-4BE0-4BE8-91E4-29A1588BCA51@apple.com" 
type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">On Sep 12, 2013, at 6:38 AM, Thomas Fletcher <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:thomas@cranksoftware.com">&lt;thomas@cranksoftware.com&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre>
  <blockquote type="cite"><pre wrap="">TDLR: Crank Software Supports a NIX port
</pre></blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->This is a question of maintenance burden.  As Geoff said every port adds a cost to developing and maintaining webkit.  You've said you support a NIX port, but a quick search doesn't show any contributions from you or crank software (very quick so feel free to correct me if i'm wrong) so it's hard to see what this "support" entails.</pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
As I mentioned in my post, most of the work that we have done for our 
customers entails bringing WebKit into <br>
embedded systems for custom products with custom CPU's and custom 
rendering technologies.&nbsp; These are<br>
generally not re-contributable items because they are not generally 
accessible to others outside of a very<br>
specific domain.&nbsp; <br>
<br>
Additionally, we work on slimming down and removing features from WebKit
 so that it&nbsp; can operate in these <br>
environments more effectively.&nbsp; Discussions on this list have shown 
repeatedly that the WebKit community is <br>
not interested in 'notching out' functionality (ie adding ENABLE'ments) 
to make the project more customizable<br>
since it potentially diminishes the WebKit brand.&nbsp; Fair enough, that's 
the project's position.<br>
<br>
Our support at the moment can be nothing more than ideological, however 
should an NIX port become mainstream<br>
then it would provide us with a public avenue to direct our energies 
towards since most of the ports that we <br>
have done would align well with using NIX as a base. <br>
<br>
While I am not at liberty to disclose our complete customer base, I can 
say that we have been working since 2008<br>
with WebKit initially using the OWB "fork"&nbsp; then moving to mainstream 
WebKit as the OWB work folded.&nbsp; <br>
Our customer's include automotive OEM and Tier 1 suppliers, consumer 
electronics producers, set-top box <br>
and gaming console device manufactures.<br>
<br>
True .. you won't see a log of commits from @cranksoftware.com but we 
are here and have a significant body<br>
of WebKit customization expertise.<br>
<br>
Thomas<br>
</body></html>