<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 11, 2013 at 6:15 PM, Peter Kasting <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:pkasting@google.com" target="_blank">pkasting@google.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="ltr"><div class="im">On Mon, Mar 11, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Ryosuke Niwa <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rniwa@webkit.org" target="_blank">rniwa@webkit.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">
<div class="gmail_quote">
<div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div><span style="color:rgb(34,34,34)">Having said that, I object to implementing a behavior doesn&#39;t match &quot;RichEdit&quot; or &quot;Edit&quot; window classes on Windows. We should match either native edit window class.</span></div>


</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>Are you referring to my comments about the cursor?  Do you object, then, to other behaviors the native controls don&#39;t support, e.g. triple-click to select all (not part of at least some versions of CRichEditCtrl, which is why I hand-implemented it in the Chrome omnibox)?</div>

</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes, we should disable triple-click-to-select-all on Windows although there are certain features we would like to support (e.g. spell checking) for convenience and the Web compatibility.  Granted, there are certain editing features that are hard to replicate native behavior (e.g. caret movements in bidirectional text) but those should still be considered as bugs.</div>

<div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>In general, if we have a superior way of doing something, are we to be forced to avoid implementing it because Microsoft didn&#39;t get around to adding it to CRichEditCtrl?</div>

</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The problem is that there is virtually no situation in which X is strictly superior to Y in all situations for any given X and Y.</div><div><br></div><div>I remember I was stunned by how selection was painted in Google Chrome on Windows when it was initially released because it violated the platform convention I was used to on Windows. There were quite few other editing-related features that struck me as unconventional such as the caret appearing before the space following a word when moving caret forward at word boundaries. All those tiny differences added up to the point where I decided not to use Google Chrome as my primary Web browser on Windows.</div>

<div><br></div><div>So I&#39;m extremely skeptical when you say we can up with a superior way of doing something on Windows based on user expectations because user expectations are often shaped by other applications they use.</div>

<div><br></div><div>- R. Niwa</div><div><br></div></div>