<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Nov 14, 2012 at 5:55 PM, Maciej Stachowiak <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com" target="_blank">mjs@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div class="im"><br><div><div>On Nov 14, 2012, at 5:19 PM, Rik Cabanier &lt;<a href="mailto:cabanier@gmail.com" target="_blank">cabanier@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</div><br><blockquote type="cite">
<br><div class="gmail_quote"><div><br></div><div>I send the question to the fx list.</div><div>Tab Atkins brought up that we could extend the &#39;globalCompositeOperator&#39; so it also takes a comma separate list of a blend and a compositing operation.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Calling:</div></div><blockquote style="margin:0 0 0 40px;border:none;padding:0px"><div class="gmail_quote">mycontext.globalCompositeOperator = &#39;multiply&#39;;</div></blockquote>would be identical to:<div>

<blockquote style="margin:0 0 0 40px;border:none;padding:0px">mycontext.globalCompositeOperator = &#39;multiply, source-over&#39;;</blockquote><div><br></div><div>This would make Canvas support blending and compositing and can be implemented with no compatibility issues later.</div>

<div><br></div>Does this ease your concern about the difference between Canvas and CSS?<br></div></blockquote><br></div></div><div>That still seems inconsistent between canvas and CSS to me. CSS will have two completely separate properties, not one that takes a comma-separated list, right? Why is one attribute with a comma-separated list superior for canvas but two properties are superior for CSS?</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>There have been requests to allow blending to be transitionable. This would be hard to accomplish with a comma separated list since it would imply that compositing is transitionable too.</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><br></div><div>Other concerns:</div><div>- Taking a comma-separated list misleadingly implies that it can have an arbitrary number of components in arbitrary order, which is not the case.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Maybe &#39;list&#39; is not the best word. Other CSS properties have similar constructs (ie border-image [1])</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>- Compared to having a separate property, this makes it hard to feature-test whether blend modes are supported.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I don&#39;t believe that is the case. A user can set and read the property. If it comes back with the same value, he knows it&#39;s supported.</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><br></div><div>I can join the fx list to discuss this directly if you think that would help.</div>
<div><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes, that would be most helpful!</div><div><br></div><div>thanks!</div><div>Rik</div><div> </div><div><br></div><div>1: <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/WD-css3-background-20100612/#the-border-image">http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/WD-css3-background-20100612/#the-border-image</a></div>
<div> </div></div><br>