<p>On May 15, 2012 10:53 AM, "Peter Kasting" <<a href="mailto:pkasting@chromium.org">pkasting@chromium.org</a>> wrote:<br>
> On Tue, May 15, 2012 at 9:31 AM, Darin Adler <<a href="mailto:darin@apple.com">darin@apple.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>><br>
>> On May 15, 2012, at 5:48 AM, Allan Sandfeld Jensen wrote:<br>
>><br>
>> > To me it seems like an odd practice, so I would like to ask what original rationale behind that style guideline is<br>
>><br>
>> Adding a list of using declarations like "using std::min" to the top of each source file would give us another ongoing maintenance job. The list in each file would grow, wed not remember to remove them when they are no longer needed, and so on.<br>

><br>
> Given how little of std:: we actually use (since WTF is used instead for most things), what about just explicitly qualifying usages with std:: directly? I realize you probably feel like these sorts of qualifications make code less readable, but the impact of that seems minor to me -- the Chromium codebase gets away with doing it and uses std:: far more often than WebKit -- and it avoids the sort of maintenance headaches you mention. It also makes it clearer to a reader when we are actually pulling in types or functions from std:: (which might not always be what we wanted), and avoids any naming conflicts from pulling in the whole std:: namespace (which is apparently the reason for this thread).</p>

<p>Can we do that if and only if we have conflicts?</p>
<p>An alternative solution is to forward conflicting symbols from std to WTF (i.e. make decisions about namespace in WTF) so that the rest of codebase can simply use the forwarded WTF symbols instead. We could even wrap whatever function we're using with a different name if we wanted.</p>

<p>- Ryosuke<br>
</p>