<div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 12:43 AM, Sergio Villar Senin <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:svillar@igalia.com">svillar@igalia.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

En 29/02/12 09:33, Konstantin Tokarev escribiu:<br>
<div class="im"><br>
>> Although I normally use it for cherry-picking a commit to upload, I have<br>
>> always missed the option to upload a bunch of commits as a single patch.<br>
>> Basically, as you said, forcing people to merge several commits in a<br>
>> single one to upload a patch to bz totally breaks the typical git<br>
>> workflow (micro-commits and so).<br>
><br>
> Do you know how to use git rebase -i?<br>
<br>
</div>Konstantin, that's why I meant with "merge several commits in a single<br>
one". You do not normally want to do that while you're developing a<br>
patch as having multiple commits gives you a lot of flexibility while<br>
developing. I normally have to create a new branch to rebase the commits<br>
I want in a single patch to upload it to the bz. That is annoying,<br>
that's why I said that having something like webkit-patch upload<br>
range_of_commits will be nice to have, as you wouldn't have to create a<br>
new branch and rebase several commits, just to upload a new patch to the bz.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>You can do this with the current -g option by adding a commit range, e.g. -g=commit1..commit2. AFAIK, the only thing you can't do currently with -g is pass a commit range *and* include the staged/working copy changes.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Under the hood it basically does what you described (create a new branch, copy the commits over as a single commit, upload from the branch, etc).</div><div><br></div></div>