<div class="gmail_quote"><span style="background-color: transparent; ">On Fri, Nov 4, 2011 at 2:39 PM, Ryan Leavengood </span><span dir="ltr" style="background-color: transparent; "><<a href="mailto:leavengood@gmail.com">leavengood@gmail.com</a>></span><span style="background-color: transparent; "> wrote:</span></div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">I would also like to throw out the idea of pulling the layout tests<br>
out into their own repo, maybe even per platform.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>How do we keep webkit/layout repositories in sync?</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

Currently the huge number of layout tests in WebKit make many git operations unbearably<br>
slow, such as git status, which basically does a stat() on every file in a repo when the plain git status is used. Even on Linux where stat() is mega-fast it takes many seconds to show git status even on a clean checkout (at least on my laptop, which admittedly isn't the<br>


fastest.) It is worse on other platforms with a slower stat().<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Even if we put in a separate repo, you'll likely need to checkout all of them anyway because if your patch ever require baselines in some port that you don't work on, you'll still need to rebaseline them.</div>

<div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
But I expect there might be a lot of pushback on such an idea,<br>
especially just to make one tool run faster.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Indeed, I'm against this idea.</div><div><br></div><div>- Ryosuke</div><div><br></div></div>