<div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 10:10 AM, Maciej Stachowiak <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com">mjs@apple.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><div class="im"><div>On Jun 27, 2011, at 9:49 AM, Ojan Vafai wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite">Can you give an example of a smooth UI that you'd need the more complex API for? When I think of the existing mail and chat apps in iOS/Android that I've use, <input type=contacts> could give just as smooth a UI as the existing apps, it's just on the browser side to make the UI good instead of on the web developer side.</blockquote>

<div>I think a token field based UI for this (like the address field in Mail on Mac OS X, or the attendees field in iCal) might make for good UI for this sort of thing. But this design assumes that the email address is desired, or at least relevant to display. Are there use cases where a contact is desired for a purpose completely unrelated to email addresses? Perhaps if you are making a dialer or an SMS app, but I'm not sure that is a case we want to support.</div>

</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think we probably do want to support those use-cases. You could still make this work with an input element. Security-wise, I think it would be OK to expose the entirety of the contact info once the user selects a contact. So the app would then be able to show whatever they want in the UI. </div>

<div><br></div><div>I didn't want to delve too much into API details before getting a list of use-cases, but with the use-cases I have in mind, I think we'd also want a way of filtering items the user can pick from, similar to the "accept" attribute on <input type=file>. For example, for an SMS app we'd only want to show contacts that have a mobile phone number. </div>

<div><br></div><div>Ojan</div></div>