On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 10:59 PM, Lou Zell <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:lzell11@gmail.com">lzell11@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="gmail_quote">I made a simple test where I load a single javascript file from within the injected js.  This single file creates a variable, window.MyGlobal.  What is very interesting to me is that this object is accessible from the loaded page!  Meaning if I create an html file that tries to access window.MyGlobal, it can.  I don't think web page authors are supposed to be able to access variables created by extensions.
<div><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br>After giving this more thought.  This behavior does seem perfectly reasonable.  The javascript I'm using (in the first email) loads the second script by appending a <script> tag to <head>.  So obviously whatever is in that script is going to be accessible by the page's author. <br>
 </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="gmail_quote"><div></div><div>I'm going to pose the question in the Apple list Adam suggested.  I'll post the solution here for completeness when I get one.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br>So, it appears the answer to my question is: you're doing it wrong!  Any javascript that my extension needs must be injected in.  I can specify multiple files to inject, but I was trying to only load files as I needed them--instead of injecting them all on each page load.  In the future I can imagine Apple adding some form of conditional injection to extensions.<br>
<br>Best, <br>Lou<br></div></div>