<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">On Nov 5, 2010, at 6:40 PM, James Robinson wrote:<br><br><blockquote type="cite">It also has worse performance characteristics since it means that the browser would have to fire the DOMAttributeChangeRequestEvent synchronously when it wanted to change the attribute and wouldn't be&nbsp;allowed to batch up the events at all.<br></blockquote><br>No need to batch because these are&nbsp;only&nbsp;triggered by discrete user actions, and don't even need to be fired unless the web app author has registered for the event.<br><div><br></div><div>Also, please note that much of the time, these would not be used in a mainstream interface. For example, you're NOT going to getting a series of synchronous UIScrollRequests &nbsp;when the user scrolls a mouse wheel. For that, you'd receive a series of asynchronous WheelEvents or ScollEvents. You might however, receive a single&nbsp;UIScrollRequest when the user pressed the PageDown key.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></body></html>