<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Jul 26, 2010, at 11:46 AM, Ryosuke Niwa wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote">Thanks a lot for the feedback!</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Jul 25, 2010 at 5:07 PM, Maciej Stachowiak <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com">mjs@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>I think the key question here is what counts as as "formatting". That needs to be determined empirically by testing other browsers, not just by reading their docs.</div></div>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>I agree, it's crucial that we carefully decide on what to preserve and what to not.</div><div><br></div><div>But MSDN&nbsp;explicitly&nbsp;say "character&nbsp;formatting" and bugs such as&nbsp;</div>

<div><a href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=13125">Bug 13125</a> - removeformat execCommand loses input elements</div><div><a href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=20216">Bug 20216</a> - execCommand RemoveFormat removes links</div>

<div>indicates that there is a demand to correct WebKit's behavior.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>If our goal is to match other browsers, we need to test them, not read the docs. MSDN often bears little relation to IE's actual behavior.</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote"><div><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#000000"><br></font></div>
<div>
I agree. &nbsp;We should test and see what other browsers do in various cases.</div><div><br></div><div>But since it's impossible for us to enumerate every possible formatting, I propose to just remove text-decoration, font-weight, etc... and the corresponding presentational elements probably using ApplyStyleCommand as a starting point. &nbsp;We can then file a separate bug or so to uncover edge cases and polish the behavior.</div>

</div></blockquote><br></div><div>Sure it's possible. We can test every CSS property and every HTML element. It should be easy to write a test case that checks every case exhaustively. I don't think it makes sense to change our behavior based on a guess of what other browsers do.</div><div><br></div><div>Regards,</div><div>Maciej</div><div><br></div><br></body></html>