<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jul 26, 2010 at 1:10 PM, Maciej Stachowiak <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mjs@apple.com">mjs@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><div class="im"><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote">
<div>
I agree.  We should test and see what other browsers do in various cases.</div><div><br></div><div>But since it&#39;s impossible for us to enumerate every possible formatting, I propose to just remove text-decoration, font-weight, etc... and the corresponding presentational elements probably using ApplyStyleCommand as a starting point.  We can then file a separate bug or so to uncover edge cases and polish the behavior.</div>



</div></blockquote><br></div></div><div>Sure it&#39;s possible. We can test every CSS property and every HTML element. It should be easy to write a test case that checks every case exhaustively. I don&#39;t think it makes sense to change our behavior based on a guess of what other browsers do.</div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I don&#39;t think that captures all possible formatting because CSS in particular has interesting effects when combined with other styles. What I meant is that we can&#39;t test every combination of all CSS properties &amp; HTML elements (i.e. enumerating every possible DOM with every possible combinations of CSS properties applied every possible way on each DOM) simply because there are infinitely many of them. Although I&#39;d guess that some of them are reputations so we might be able to find a finite subset that suffice the purpose. anyhow, I agree that testing every CSS property and every HTML element will be a good idea.  That&#39;ll at least give us a starting point.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Best,</div><div>Ryosuke</div></div>