<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 7, 2010 at 7:22 PM, James Robinson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jamesr@google.com">jamesr@google.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div></div><div class="h5">On Wed, Jul 7, 2010 at 7:19 PM, Oliver Hunt <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:oliver@apple.com" target="_blank">oliver@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><br><div><div><div>On Jul 7, 2010, at 7:16 PM, Tony Gentilcore wrote:</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 7, 2010 at 6:50 PM, Mo, Zhenyao <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:zhenyao@gmail.com" target="_blank">zhenyao@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>


<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Maybe I should complain this in a different threads, but recently the commit bot waiting time is way too long.  Several times a patch of mine got the r+ and cq+ and it landed two days later.  This is really frustrating.<br>





<br>I am very tempted to use svn directly to commit patches, but that means the patch only gets tested in my local environments. Like one time my patch breaks the leopard bot, turns out the failed test is skipped on leopard, which is exactly my OS.  If I land it through the commit bots, I could identify the issue earlier.<br>




</blockquote><div><br></div><div>I agree they are closely related. A greener tree means a faster commit queue and a faster commit queue means less people subvert it and break the tree. The hard problem is figuring out how to fix the incentives so subverting the queue isn&#39;t so desirable.</div>


</div></blockquote><div><br></div></div><div>What do you mean by subvert the queue?  The commit queue is a tool to streamline commits from contributors who do not have commit access to the repository.  If you have the ability to commit you should not be using the commit queue to land your patches.</div>


<div><br></div></div></div></blockquote><div> </div></div></div><div>That&#39;s not my understanding of the commit queue.  I use the commit queue to land my patches when possible so that the patch receives further testing before it hits the tree and potentially affects a large number of contributors.  Why do you think this is a bad idea?  Is this preference codified somewhere (formally or informally)?</div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Interesting. I&#39;m a very new committer and it is possible I&#39;ve completely misunderstood it. I thought of it as a useful tool to help make sure our patches don&#39;t break the tree. But given James&#39; response I&#39;m now very interested to hear what others think.</div>

<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="gmail_quote">
<div><br></div><div>- James</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><div></div><font color="#888888"><div>


--Oliver</div><div><br></div></font></div></div><div class="im"><br>_______________________________________________<br>
webkit-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:webkit-dev@lists.webkit.org" target="_blank">webkit-dev@lists.webkit.org</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.webkit.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/webkit-dev" target="_blank">http://lists.webkit.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/webkit-dev</a><br>
<br></div></blockquote></div><br>
</blockquote></div><br>