<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Oct 25, 2009, at 2:36 PM, Alexander Cohen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Oct 25, 2009, at 5:23 PM, Maciej Stachowiak wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Oct 25, 2009, at 2:01 PM, Alexander Cohen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div><br>In the events of a tag, i needed to add checks to see what type of script was being called. A lot if not all of the time, we will usually find a "javascript:" in the event code so i can also look there for my defined scripting language and call into the right code. </div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Attribute event listeners do not usually have "javascript:" in them. Here is an example from Google's home page:</div><div><pre><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Helvetica"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="white-space: normal;">&lt;a href="<a href="http://images.google.com/imghp?hl=en&amp;tab=wi">http://images.google.com/imghp?hl=en&amp;tab=wi</a>" onclick=gbar.qs(this) class=gb1&gt;Images&lt;/a&gt;</span></font></pre></div><div>Notice that the onclick value doesn't start with javascript:. You are probably thinking of javascript: URLs in links, like this:</div><div><br></div><div>&lt;a href="javascript:callSomething()"&gt;</div><div><br></div><div>You could invent a new URL scheme that runs your scripting language instead of JavaScript, but I don't think there is anything you can do about onclick handlers, unless you're willing to break compatibility with existing Web content.</div></div></div></blockquote><br></div><div>You're right. But this does give an opportunity for my scripting language to get through since executing mine as javascript will probably result in an error. I can definitely catch that and check for another language.</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think that would be fragile, especially if polyglot or near-polyglot programs are possible. Unfortunately, inline event listeners were never designed with the idea of multiple scripting languages in mind. Fortunately, you can add event listeners just fine using code in a &lt;script&gt; element, so you don't lose much by not supporting them for a new scripting language.</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Just by curiosity, would it be bad to do something like this (notice the "newscriptinglang:" in the onload ):</div><div><br></div><div>&lt;a href="<a href="http://images.google.com/imghp?hl=en&amp;tab=wi">http://images.google.com/imghp?hl=en&amp;tab=wi</a>" onclick=newscriptinglang:gbar.qs(this) class=gb1&gt;Images&lt;/a</div></div></blockquote></div><br><div>That onclick handler is a valid JavaScript program, "newscriptlanglang:" is interpreted as a goto label. Whether there is Web content out there accidentally doing that, I don't know.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><div>If you really want to come up with something, then I think your best bet would be to declare the scripting language for event listeners using an explicit mechanism. One possible way is to define a meta keyword so you could say &lt;meta name="event-listener-language" content="application/x-fooscript"&gt;. That has the downside of being global for the whole document, so you would not be able to mix inline event listeners in both languages. It has the benefit that you won't misinterpret any existing Web content, but the downside that Web pages using the new scripting language may fail in mysterious ways (instead of just not running their scripts).</div><div><br></div><div>Regards,</div><div>Maceij</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "></div></blockquote></div></body></html>