<div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jun 5, 2009 at 9:13 PM, Darren VanBuren <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:onekopaka@gmail.com">onekopaka@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word">I agree that using RPC is inefficient, and that we don&#39;t want to make the review process any more of a pain. We could also try writing our own code review software specifically designed to work with Bugzilla, so that we could run directly in the Bugzilla environment, and we could modify and retrieve bugs without throwing stuff around RPC channels, just by running some calls in the Bugzilla modules.</div>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>FWIW, in Chromium land we do all the patches *solely* on Rietveld, and never touch the bug tracker at all with them.  We have tools that auto-update bugs when patches are checked in and can provide handy links back and forth between the tools, and that&#39;s enough.  I&#39;m not a WebKit reviewer but I was a Mozilla reviewer, which also does things on Bugzilla, and I don&#39;t miss the ability to post a patch on a bug at all.  There is literally nothing in that workflow that helps me review/land patches more easily, and it&#39;s still just as easy to backtrack after the fact and find what got reviewed/landed starting from a bug.  So if people who wanted to use Rietveld to do code review didn&#39;t have obvious ways to attach those patches to Bugzilla bugs, I&#39;m not sure it would be a big stumbling block.  (Right now it&#39;s about 10x easier for me to get a Chromium patch reviewed than a WebKit one just because a single shell command can create a Rietveld issue with my patch and set the description up for me.)</div>
<div><br></div><div>PK</div></div>