<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 5:25 PM, Darin Adler <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:darin@apple.com">darin@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On May 7, 2009, at 4:56 PM, Jeremy Orlow wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
I&#39;m continuing to work on <a href="https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=25376" target="_blank">https://bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=25376</a> and noticed that the map of origins to localStorageAreas is owned by the PageGroup class.  I&#39;m having a bit of trouble understanding what exactly page groups are used for.<br>

</blockquote>
<br></div>
PageGroup exists so you can have multiple web pages in a single application that share state, including frame namespace, such as the multiple windows and tabs in Safari.<br>
<br>
Separate page groups allow other web views to be separate, allowing the same application to use WebKit for things that should be isolated from web browsing; for example Safari on Windows uses web views for things like Preferences and text input.<br>

<br>
This is exposed as part of the WebKit API on Mac OS X, with the setGroupName: method.<br>
<br>
It may be a useless concept for Chromium but it’s critical on Mac OS X.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Didn&#39;t mean to imply they were useless, at all.  Was just trying to understand their use.</div><div><br></div><div>
Thanks!</div><div>J</div></div>