<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Sep 30, 2008 at 1:35 PM, Brady Eidson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:beidson@apple.com">beidson@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">If we add a new well specified API that all browser vendors agree on, everybody wins.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>No; everybody who&#39;s willing and able to change wins.</div><div><br></div>
<div>Everyone else wins or loses depending on whether the new behavior is better or worse for them. &nbsp;My argument is that this makes life better for nearly all pages affected. &nbsp;The entire reason to change setTimeout() is precisely _because_ not everyone will change their web pages.</div>
<div><br></div><div>(Furthermore, I claim the number of people who will realize they could get something better, and change their code to get it, is lower than the number of people who will see that something is wrong and fix it.)</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="Ih2E3d">negates the need to introduce new incompatibilities into the already published web by changing setTimeout().</div>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>This still implies there is a meaningful compatibility hit to making this change. &nbsp;I have not yet seen any reason to agree that is the case (in the sense of &quot;CPU usage is not a web compatibility issue&quot;). &nbsp;There is _already_ no compatibility here. &nbsp;Browsers do completely different things, of an equivalent magnitude (6 ms) to the suggested change of 10 ms -&gt; 3 or 4 ms. &nbsp;Firefox is even different based on whether Flash happens to be running! &nbsp;How can there be compatibility problems introduced by this proposal that don&#39;t already exist?</div>
<div><br></div><div>PK</div></div></div>