<div dir="ltr"><div>Thanks for the response. That clarified number of confusions.&nbsp;Now&nbsp;working from a non-MAC&nbsp;platform, the Objective-C bindings will not be used. These bindings are meant for developers working in Mac through the Cocoa framework. Am I&nbsp;right&nbsp;in making this judgement? Now,&nbsp;if that is the case then is it mandatory to generate JavaScript bindings to successfully build webkit? It&nbsp;is becuase number of files will be depending upon these&nbsp;generated files.&nbsp;Thanks.</div>

<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>- J R Shah&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br></div>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 11:48 PM, Darin Adler <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:darin@apple.com">darin@apple.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">
<div class="Ih2E3d">On Aug 7, 2008, at 8:49 AM, Javed Rabbani wrote:<br><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">Why is there any need to generate JavaScript bindings via IDL files using Perl scripts. What I want to say is why these binding files are not part of the source?<br>
</blockquote><br></div>There are at least two different answers to your question:<br><br>&nbsp; &nbsp;1) Using IDL files instead of hand written bindings allows us to easily change details of the binding mechanism without modifying hundreds of files. It&#39;s been a great boon for folks working on the WebKit project.<br>
<br>&nbsp; &nbsp;2) The WebKit source repository doesn&#39;t include copies of generated files. That includes the files generated by the IDL scripts, bison-based parsers, flex-based lexers, and many other generated source files. This is the usual practice in most software projects. Checking in copies of those generated files would help some people, but can cause all sorts of problems.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>&nbsp; &nbsp;-- Darin<br><br></font></blockquote></div><br></div>